1

Nature magazine, Vol.  514 October 2014.

2

Here, fan is referred to as a seduced enthusiast, an unconditional follower and tireless connoisseur. But it should be clear that architecture is a service and thus obliges remuneration. Dilettantism and excellence are perfectly compatible with work and money. There you have it, dear Sou.

3

In this sense the journey, normally excluded from the curriculum, mandatory credits and core subjects, stands as one of the most powerful weapons for learning architecture through experience.http://madc-texts.blogspot.com.es/2014/07/la-arquitectura-del-viaje.html

4

The professor should moderate, recommend, select and orient students in this vast universe of asymmetrical quality content. Technology is always a means and never and end in itself.

5

In an environment of utmost uncertainty, the skills related to creative, dizzying decision making override the mere learning of facts in the old manual mindset. In this regard, recommended reading is “Arquitectos, ¿para qué?” produced by Madrid’s Club de Debates Urbanos. See Federico Soriano’s intervention (minutes 32-42) where he explains how a school should breed “conditions for surroundings and not conditions for knowledge” and gives the example of different emergency protocols for Russian astronauts (behavioural model) and United States astronauts (knowledge-based model).

6

Reality is understood to be global and planetary, and common destiny as applying to all Humankind with its highly diverse and unique manifestations.

The teaching of Architecture: unlikely connections

Dau Rodó, Joan Brossa, 1969

Dau Rodó, Joan Brossa, 1969. Poem-object, MACBA collection.

According to Nature magazine, universities in the year 2030 will look very little like those of today. Those who are unable to bend and stretch with this evolution will simply become extinct.1 It is not a question here of taking a snapshot of the current state of teaching, as disparate and varied as the zodiac. Nor is it a question of speculating about its future. What is of interest is merely to observe some connections beneficial to the process of learning in architecture.

Connecting with what is universal

Sou Fujimoto said that the prime goal of any school should be to generate fans of architecture.2 It would be very merit-worthy to pursue that goal in each and every one of the classes, subjects and courses. Experience in architecture makes no distinction between departments or skills, which is why mainstreaming seems to be a must. True teaching of a subject involves integrating all of the other collateral content. There are no minor subjects in architecture, as the old masters, true revellers in geometry, the technical, calculations, history and drawing, crafty wielders of architecture as a universal subject.

Connecting with the informal

The possibility of finding places haphazardly facilitates debate, exchange, spontaneous activity, collaborative learning, experience within a small group and at the same time, the feeling of belonging to a community: the architecture of relations.3 Non-social, virtual space has now become established as a powerful informal channel for broadening education in architecture. We should avail ourselves of synergies and possibilities that Internet’s accessibility has to offer, its ample capacity for content generation and sharing, creating communities and, above all, for its absolute consistency and compatibility with any academic project.4

Connecting with the students

Today’s students have two characteristics of their time, a true calling and digital proficiency. Wasting their talent on copying by dictation makes no sense. The subjects and reading lists are in their hands. The encounter with them in the classroom must be seized as an opportunity to explore and work together on solving problems or identifying conflicts. Connected students can learn and gain knowledge. Students in the classroom must marshal their motivation to explore and think.5 We have many techniques at our disposal to foster creativity from the conditions in our surroundings through participative projects, models produced by groups, flipped classes and the well-known TGT (Teams Games Tournaments by De Vries and Edwards, 1973). The results are positive.

Connecting with diversity

Any methodology for teaching architecture must stimulate the very different interests of students that are increasingly diverse and precocious in their approach to the profession. Technology, fashion, research, cooperation, teaching, marketing, communication, engineering, design, programming, management and mediation… the boundaries of architecture are broadened and ramified in an unprecedented process of expansion. The current degree system agreed in Bologna including undergraduate and graduate degrees should work. Regardless of the inevitable controversy, it enables a host of hybrid, cross-cutting profiles in what has become a complex, global, diverse and competitive profession.

Connecting with society

Schools of architecture should be ranked by their active participation and their actual improvement of the quality of life in some specific place. Not long ago, Víctor López Cotelo told us in Madrid of his design to refurbish an old military hospital in Granada as a school of architecture. An exhibition room open to the public will display the works of the students and serve as an area for debate and participation. As if the teaching of architecture and the actual physical world where it stands drew up a blueprint for their shared destiny.6

Unlikely connections. Or perhaps not.


Text translated by Beth Gelb
Notas de página
1

Nature magazine, Vol.  514 October 2014.

2

Here, fan is referred to as a seduced enthusiast, an unconditional follower and tireless connoisseur. But it should be clear that architecture is a service and thus obliges remuneration. Dilettantism and excellence are perfectly compatible with work and money. There you have it, dear Sou.

3

In this sense the journey, normally excluded from the curriculum, mandatory credits and core subjects, stands as one of the most powerful weapons for learning architecture through experience.http://madc-texts.blogspot.com.es/2014/07/la-arquitectura-del-viaje.html

4

The professor should moderate, recommend, select and orient students in this vast universe of asymmetrical quality content. Technology is always a means and never and end in itself.

5

In an environment of utmost uncertainty, the skills related to creative, dizzying decision making override the mere learning of facts in the old manual mindset. In this regard, recommended reading is “Arquitectos, ¿para qué?” produced by Madrid’s Club de Debates Urbanos. See Federico Soriano’s intervention (minutes 32-42) where he explains how a school should breed “conditions for surroundings and not conditions for knowledge” and gives the example of different emergency protocols for Russian astronauts (behavioural model) and United States astronauts (knowledge-based model).

6

Reality is understood to be global and planetary, and common destiny as applying to all Humankind with its highly diverse and unique manifestations.

Autor:
Miguel Ángel Díaz Camacho, doctor Arquitecto por la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. Es el actual Presidente de la Asociación Sostenibilidad y Arquitectura vinculada al Consejo Superior de los Colegios de Arquitectos de España. Dirige la compañía MADC & Partners SLP dedicada a la arquitectura, el urbanismo y el diseño ambiental, obteniendo numerosos premios en concursos nacionales e internacionales, así como reconocimientos a su obra construida. Profesor universitario, investigador, escritor y crítico de arquitectura, es autor, entre otros, de los libros “Párrafos de Arquitectura. Core(oh)grafías” (2016) y “Arquitectura y Cambio Climático” (2018).

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